Increasingly companies are using third-party digital hiring platforms to recruit and select job applicants.  These products, explicitly or implicitly, promise to reduce or eliminate the bias of hiring managers in making selection decisions.  Instead, the platforms grade applicants based on a variety of purportedly objective factors.  For example, a platform may scan thousands of resumes

Our colleague Michelle Capezza of Epstein Becker Green authored an article in Confero, titled “Managing Employee Benefits in the Face of Technological Change.”

Following is an excerpt – click here to download the full article in PDF format:

There are many employee benefits challenges facing employers today, from determining the scope and scale of traditional

Howard Gerver is a self-proclaimed human capital data geek.  His “day job” specializes in finding innovative and practical ways to save money by identifying “golden nuggets” mined from Big HR Data sets, such as claims and human capital data.  A lot of this work includes analytics, claim auditing and eligibility auditing.  His “nights and weekend”

By Steven C. Sheinberg, General Counsel of the Anti-Defamation League & Guest TMT blogger.*

A recent McKinsey report on twelve “disruptive” technologies included four that will fundamentally transform how employers relate to their employees: mobile Internet, automation of knowledge work, the Internet of things and cloud computing. I would add to the list three results

By Anna A. Cohen and Nancy L. Gunzenhauser

As an increasing number of employers use social media to screen prospective employees and to monitor the activities of current employees, several states have enacted social media privacy laws, including Arkansas, California, Colorado, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Utah and Washington.  Oregon joins those